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First Year Program RW 1299 Library Session

This guide accompanies the library session in the Research-based Writing 1299 course.

Using a concept map to start researching a topic

Completing a concept map with a research topic will help more efficiently search library databases. 

Note: There is a fillable version of this concept map available to download as well.

blank concept map

Phrase searching with your key concepts

About Phrase Searching with Quotation Marks

Search for an exact phrase by placing quotation marks around the search phrase.

Tip: phrase searching works when you are searching library databases, Google, and the Lavery Library Big Red Search Box.

Example for searching a database for "civil rights movement"

For example, a search for "civil rights movement" will search for that exact phrase instead of treating it as a search for civil AND rights AND movement. 

Shown below are two database searches. The one on the right uses phrase searching:two database advanced search boxes shown. on left, top box reads civil rights movement, middle box reads united states, and bottom box reads activists. On right, a highlighted image with a star shows top box reading "civil rights movements" with quotation marks, middle box reads "united states" with quotation marks, and bottom box reads activists

Examples for names and titles

Phrase searching is a useful search strategy when you search for a person's name, or a title. 

  • "Frederick Douglass"
  • "The Girl with the Louding Voice"